SEVILLE/BITTER ORANGE MARMALADE…Bittersweet pleasure!

“And the fruits will outdo what the flowers have promised.”
Francois de Malherbe
SEVILLE/BITTER ORANGE MARMALADE…locally called ‘TANGERINE MARMALADE’
I sent my daughter & her friend off to my neighbours house to get a bagful of these tart little oranges; also referred to as ‘narangis‘ here. My neighbours’ tree was laden with them & she was more than happy to see them put to good use. I sent her a jar too, & distributed all but one, as I have a long list of bitter marmalade lovers waiting for their anual share! Most people here grow these plants for ornamental value. I got this British-style recipe from a friend of my mothers’. British-style marmalade is a sweet preserve with a bitter tang made from fruit, sugar, water, and (in some commercial brands) a gelling agent. American-style marmalade is sweet, not bitter.

BITTER ORANGES

The name “bitter orange” refers to a citrus tree (Citrus aurantium) and its fruit. Many varieties of bitter oranges are used for their essential oil, which is used in perfume and as a flavoring. They are also used in herbal medicine. Other names include sour orange, bigarade orange and Seville orange. Seville orange (or bigarade) is a widely-known, extremely tart orange now grown throughout the Mediterranean region. It has a thick, dimpled skin and is prized for making marmalade, being higher in pectin than the sweet orange. The unripe fruit called “narthangai” is commonly used in Southern Indian food, especially in Tamil cuisine.

Fresh off the tree from my neighbours’ house…

Pipped!!

Every year when winter comes, I look at the fruit laden tree & talk myself into making marmalade again. It’s tough work & I end up like a clone of Edward Scissorhands because I snip the peels with kitchen scissors, & it takes forever. DH is witness to my swearing I shall never make marmalade again; & is also witness to my backtracking die-hard ways year after year. The taste of the marmalade is unbelieveable. It is typically bittersweet & to die for; many many leagues ahead of some store bought jars. Hot buttered toasts with a dash of marmalade is pure nirvana. Both the kids love a spoonful when they return home from school!!

Ingredients:

Tangerines – 1 kg
Sugar – 1 kg
Water – 250ml

Method:
  • Sterilize 4-5 jam jars. Place a metal spoon in each jar (this ensures that the glass jar will not crack when the hot jam is poured in).
  • Halve the tangerines & deseed them. Tie the seeds in a small piece of cheesecloth & reserve them.
  • Now quarter the tangerines & then snip finely into strips with kitchen scissors.

  • Put the strips with the pouch of seeds in a heavy bottom pan on full heat. Boil for 2-3 minutes till the peel is tender, stirring constantly.

  • Add water & boil for 2-3 minutes. Now add sugar, stirring constantly.
  • Continue to boil on full heat for a further 10-15 minutes until the mixture thickens & the strips becomes translucent.
  • Drop a few drops on a cold plate (like a metal steel plate to check if the jam is setting).
  • Put off the flame, discard the muslin pouch with the seeds & cool the pan slightly in a bath of cold water for 10minutes.
  • Now pour the marmalade into the jars. Refridgerate.

Citrus preserves are generally called ‘Marmalades’. The satisfaction of making your own jar of marmalade is worth all the effort that goes in.

In jars & waiting for despatch!

Gotta get this to Andreas‘ for her ‘Grow Your Own’ event quick. She hosts an event that celebrates the bounty of the garden.

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Comments

  1. Purnima says:

    Deeba! So much of efforts there, deseeding,snipping n cooking them! Goodness, no wonder marmalades come with a huge price tag! But it spreads so beautifully n evenly! I shall surely try it when time permits, but within a month’s time! tks for sharing!

  2. Andrea says:

    This is so beautiful! I would love to have some of those jars in my refrigerator! I’ve never made marmalade but I’m feeling inspired now! Thanks for sharing a great entry for Grow Your Own!

  3. Wow!! sunny marmalade on toast is just wonderful and your home made jars of freshly marmalade must be beating store bought ones hollow!!

    Narthangai pickle is my favourite and don’t get it very easily…

  4. Rachel says:

    Wow marmalade on toasted bread is just awesome…great pics….

  5. I make this marmalade every year but haven’t done this yet. Hopefully I will do it soon. I have however made an orange liqueur which I have just finished tonight.

  6. Passionate baker...& beyond says:

    Thanks Purnima…a lot of effort but worth every bit; after its done though!!
    Andrea…I love the idea of GYO! Thanks.
    You bet Miri…a friend I sent a jar to called last eve to say she didnt know what she had been missing! Am gonna explore the pickle option one day too. Did you get my mail?
    Thanks Rachel…reminded me of your hang-out!
    Yeah Ivy…am glad we both share quite the same interests & tastes. The liqueur must have been great!

  7. Passionate baker...& beyond says:

    Thanks Purnima…a lot of effort but worth every bit; after its done though!!
    Andrea…I love the idea of GYO! Thanks.
    You bet Miri…a friend I sent a jar to called last eve to say she didnt know what she had been missing! Am gonna explore the pickle option one day too. Did you get my mail?
    Thanks Rachel…reminded me of your hang-out!
    Yeah Ivy…am glad we both share quite the same interests & tastes. The liqueur must have been great!

  8. Aparna says:

    This is great, Deeba. I find jams too sweet but love marmalade.
    I make a lot of pickles and have finally made my first jam. I’ll keep it a surprise till I do a post.

  9. No didn’t get your mail Deeba….could you please resend it, I checked my spam folder too and it isnt there either. My mail id just in case is peppercornmill at gmail.com

    Thanks!

    Miri

  10. Dwiana P says:

    hey first time here you have a great recipes. I like they way you explain it step by step with pictures. Thanks so much.

  11. Purnima says:

    Deeba, I made these yesterday with ‘Afandi’ variety of oranges, little did I know, the would be seedless!! SO as you may foresee, I messed it up..i went in a haste n added a spoon of gelatin powder (cherry flavour :( ) now the color is cherry-orange, the taste sweet n after taste of bitter!!
    I still hv saved 2nd batch of oranges…for want of tips from you, shall mail you soon!! sorry!!

  12. Pearlsofeast says:

    Deeba, I checked ur marmalade recipe, sounds Fantastic!.
    I do my own conserve with pineapple and raspberry but never tried with orange. I think this would taste much better with rinds.

  13. Divya says:

    yummy marmalade..i wish i stayed close to you so that i could get those as part of my annual share too!!yummy!!

  14. Chef Jay says:

    This looks and sounds absolutely delicious. There are so many different fruits and vegetables that can be preserved, and this is why I love canning. I actually like to make my own canned salsa. I mean why buy from preserves and salsa and other products from the store when you can make them yourself. For more information about making more products like this from scratch please visit my site.

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